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CARRIER HAWAII

 
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Carrier Hawaii has grown to be the largest air conditioning distributor in Hawaii, mainly due to its long-term commitment to the local industry.  It locally stocks the largest equipment inventory and replacement parts to reduce downtimes.  This reduces the probable risk of loss of business to a customer or lack of comfort to a homeowner.  Carrier Hawaii has it's main office/warehouse in Kapolei Business Park, and has three branches in the state, in Honolulu, Kahului, and Kona.    

 

Carrier Hawaii has six engineers on staff; five are graduate mechanical engineers.  We have three systems engineers for field technical support, with an average of 25 years of experience, all with Carrier.  All our engineers have completed factory-training. 

 

The reputation of the equipment is not just based on lowest price.  Important factors such as pre-design assistance, construction supervision, post-sale support, replacement availability, training, quality, energy efficiency, reliability, and a company's sustained integrity and commitment to the industry play a major role in the decision making.

 

Carrier Hawaii has been ranked within Carrier Corp as one of the top ten performing distributors in North America for the last 16 consecutive years. 

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read more                               related articles: about John Arizumi , about Robert Pascua

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WHAT SHOULD YOU KNOW ABOUT CHILLER PLANTS - CHILLERS, VFD'S, IPLV'S, SPLV'S & DDC CONTROLS

by John L. Arizumi P.E., posted March 2015.

Many buildings in Hawaii have reached 25+ years in age and many are renovating/upgrading their air conditioning chiller plants.  With many “energy warriors” offering expertise and products, building owners and engineers should be knowledgeable of what they are getting.  This article will shed some light on making better decisions.

There are lots of discussions about variable speed chillers as it provides improved energy efficiencies.  Then there is talk about magnetic-bearing chillers which adds to the confusion thinking they improve energy efficiency.  No way.  Magnetic bearings only eliminate the use of lubricant oil, but be aware mag-bearing chillers have maintenance costs for its bearing capacitors that need periodic replacement in lieu of oil changes.  In addition, most mag-bearing chillers do not have seismic certification required by many building codes.

Many think VFD’s are the panacea to energy savings.  We should be aware of range of speed reduction when comparing a centrifugal chiller and a screw chiller.  A centrifugal compressor behaves by the same laws as for centrifugal fans  (h.p. proportional to cube of rpm, pressure proportional to square of rpm, and flow rate proportional to rpm).  Unlike positive displacement compressors such as screw or reciprocating compressors, centrifugals use pressure “lift” to create the pressure differential.  Therefore, VFD centrifugals can only reduce compressor speeds by 35% by virtue of design and the rest of the load reduction is accomplished by the time-proven inlet guide vanes.  In addition, because centrifugal compressor speeds determine the head pressure (lift) to transfer heat, in Hawaii, variable speed reduction for centrifugals is not as significant as in cooler climates.  With variable-speed screw chillers, the speed turndown is 75% and is not dependent on the weather but is proportional to the load, so it offers the better energy savings because of the range of speed reduction, depending on the load, not the weather.  Another interesting point is screw chillers have quick response and can go from 100% down to 25% in less than a minute, whereas centrifugals will take 7-10 times longer which most likely mean nuisance safety shutdowns and alarm codes during fast changing conditions, e.g., tower fan failure, low water temperature, etc.

Integrated part-load value (IPLV) is a value established by AHRI 550/590, so one can easily compare part-load efficiencies for different chillers of the same capacities.  Chillers rarely run at full load.  Keep in mind the weather data of AHRI 550/590 originally used Atlanta, Georgia, whose weather is very different from Hawaii.  Even with the present use of 29 cities averaged, it is far different.  For example, in Atlanta 55% of the annual hours have entering condensing water temperatures less than 70F, whereas in Hawaii it is less than 2-1/2%.  In addition, IPLV is based on single chiller plant operation at AHRI 550/590 conditions.  Today, most plants have multiple chillers and IPLV is a very inaccurate way to determine energy efficiency of the multiple chiller plant.

The most accurate methodology to compare energy consumption of a proposed chiller plant is to establish an SPLV, or system part-load value.  This entails computing the energy consumption of all energy-consuming components of the plant, not just the chillers, e.g., chillers, chilled water pumps, condenser water pumps, cooling tower fans, secondary pumps, etc, (VFD or constant flow), using the actual local weather data and actual building occupancy schedule of the design.  This analysis will provide you the most accurate energy consumption comparison as well as the life-cycle cost.  You will easily see the big difference from just judging efficiencies on IPLV’s for a single chiller.

Most important are the chiller plant controls.  You can have the most efficient chillers and components of the mechanical plant, but if the controls are not designed and commissioned properly, your plant will not perform to the optimum design efficiency.  It is so important the DDC controls are integrated to operate as the system was designed.  Think of the control system as the conductor of a symphony.  You can have the best violinists, cellists, bassists, brass section, percussion, etc., but without a great conductor it is hard to make great music.  Very important is to make sure the DDC controls integrate to the exact requirements of the chiller controls as this is the command center of the plant and the biggest consumer of energy.

Last, work with reputable chiller suppliers when designing or upgrading a plant.  Owners should get the chiller suppliers involved early during preliminary discussions, not just during the bid, so you are abreast of the latest technology.  Best is to have potential suppliers do presentations for their proposed plant.  With so many innovations on the market, it is difficult to make clear, strategic decisions.  Remember to look at the big picture, not just the chillers. The old adage:  You get what you pay for.  Use a trusted equipment supplier that has a solid reputation of understanding chiller plant systems and controls to provide good pre- and post-sale support, strong engineering support, field technical assistance, local inventory of equipment and replacement parts to reduce downtimes, and ongoing service training to support your staff.  This large investment can benefit or plague your business for years. 

Once the decision is made and the plant is installed, remember, it is between the building owner and the chiller supplier for the life of the plant.  The developer, designers, and contractors are pretty much out of the picture once installed.  Just you and your supplier.  How well your supplier supports you will determine how reliable your plant operates for its useful life.  Then, too, make sure your supplier will be around for the long haul.  Choose wisely.  Many systems never match up to their promises.

download pdf file of this article 

John Arizumi is a registered mechanical engineer and has been with Carrier Corporation of Syracuse, New York, since 1975.  He holds a bachelors and masters degrees in mechanical engineering.  He lectured at the University of Hawaii at Manoa for 18 years on Air Conditioning Fundamentals and is a chartered member of the Board of Advisors for the College of Engineering at UHM and a chartered member (Hawaii Section) of Pi Tau Sigma, honorary mechanical engineering fraternity.  He is the president of Carrier Hawaii, distributor for Carrier Air Conditioning equipment and is a member of Carrier Corp.’s Commercial Distributor Advisory Council.

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THE VALUE-ADDED OF DOING BUSINESS WITH CARRIER HAWAII

by John L. Arizumi P.E., posted January 2014.

 

One of the biggest myths in building industry is all air conditioning brands are equal as long as it meets specifications.  Owners, developers, architects, and general contractors, often mistake an air conditioning system as a commodity from a local supplier that provides comfort cooling. 

One needs to understand that an air conditioning system is one of the most dynamic components in a building, along with the elevator system.  We always take them for granted when they’re working, but when they aren’t, they create a major disruption.  Both provide relentless, consistent, reliable service often without notice.  Both are considered the silent slaves of a building.

Today, with the move to green building design and LEED certified buildings, the air conditioning systems are no longer rated on a “first-cost” basis, as the emphasis focuses on indoor air quality, highest energy efficiency, lowest operational and maintenance costs, and higher levels of thermal comfort.

In Hawaii, the four major brands represented in Hawaii are Carrier, McQuay, Trane and York.  Carrier Hawaii is the largest locally-owned and operated distributor.

Carrier Hawaii has grown to be the largest air conditioning distributor in Hawaii, mainly due to its long-term commitment to the local industry.  It locally stocks the largest equipment inventory and replacement parts to reduce downtimes.  This reduces the probable risk of loss of business to a customer or lack of comfort to a homeowner.  Carrier Hawaii has its main office/warehouse in Kapolei Business Park and has three branches in the state, in Honolulu, Kahului, and Kona.  Besides Carrier, Carrier Hawaii is also the distributor for Panasonic Air Conditioning to offer the most complete line of products and systems.

Carrier Hawaii has six sales engineers on staff; five are graduate mechanical engineers.  We have three systems engineers for field technical support, with an average of over 25 years experience, all with Carrier.  All our engineers have completed factory-training.

Carrier Hawaii is the only distributor that offers local factory service training annually at our private training facility with a 40-seat classroom and laboratory with operational equipment for hands-on training.  To date, we have locally trained over 4,000 technicians and engineers to save employers travel time and expenses.  The training is open to the entire industry.

The reputation of the equipment is not just based on lowest price.  Important factors such as pre-design assistance, construction supervision, post-sale support, replacement availability, training, quality, energy efficiency, reliability, and a company’s sustained integrity and commitment to the industry play a major role in the decision making.

Carrier Hawaii has been ranked within Carrier Corp as one of the top ten performing Carrier distributors in North America for the past 16 years.

February 2014

Biographies – Carrier Hawaii is owned by John Arizumi and Robert Pascua.  They acquired the distributorship in 1990.  Arizumi, a registered mechanical engineer, has 39 years, and Pascua has 32 years with Carrier.

 

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Carrier Hawaii :: 2060 Lauwiliwili Street :: Kapolei, Hawaii 96707 (PH: 808-677-6339, FAX: 808-682-2828